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New Paper

Martins, M., Reis, A. M., Castro, S. L., & Gaser, C. (2021). Gray matter correlates of reading fluency deficits: SES matters, IQ does not. Brain Structure and Function. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00429-021-02353-1

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New Paper

Oliveira, M. A., Guerra, M. P., Lencastre, L., Castro, S., Moutinho, S., & Park, C. L. (2021). Stress-Related Growth Scale – Short Form: A Portuguese validation for cancer patients. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 21(3), Article 100255. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijchp.2021.100255

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New Paper

Camacho, A., Alves, R. A., De Smedt, F., Van Keer, H., & Boscolo, P. (2021). Relations among motivation, behaviour, and performance in writing: A multiple-group structural equation modeling study. British Journal of Educational Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjep.12430X

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New Paper

Cordeiro, C., Magalhães, S., Rocha, R., Mesquita, A., Olive, T., Castro, S. L., & Limpo, T. (2021). Promoting third graders’ executive functions and literacy: A pilot study examining the benefits of mindfulness vs. relaxation training. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article 643794. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.643794

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New Paper

Souza, A. S., Overkott, C., & Matya, M. (2021). Categorical distinctiveness constrains the labeling benefit in visual working memory. Journal of Memory and Language, 119, Article 104242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jml.2021.104242

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New Paper

Vicente, S. G., Benito-Sánchez, I., Barbosa, F., Gaspar, N., Dores, A. R., Rivera, D., & Arango-Lasprilla, J. C. (2021). Normative data for verbal fluency and object naming tests in a sample of European Portuguese adult population. Applied Neuropsychology: Adult. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/23279095.2020.1868472

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About us


The Neurocognition and Language Research Group conducts basic and applied research on speech, language and communication.

How does our mind capture the communicative intention from a purely physical acoustic stream? Why are some children expert story tellers and yet stumble when writing simple words? How can speaking, conversely, be more effortful than writing, as Vladimir Nabokov observed on himself? We take a neurocognitive approach to the study of these and related questions, using a range of behavioral, neurophysiological and neuro-imaging methods.

The group is part of the Center for Psychology at University of Porto and conducts its work at the Speech Laboratory, launched in 1991.